Sergio Troncoso is a writer of essays, short stories, and novels, and the author of five books. Among the numerous awards he has won are the Premio Aztlan Literary Prize, Southwest Book Award, Bronze Award for Essays from ForeWord Reviews, and International Latino Book Award.

Please address professional inquiries to: SergioTroncoso@gmail.com. Click here for a PDF biography and a high resolution JPG of Sergio Troncoso.

From This Wicked Patch of Dust:
“Troncoso’s novel is an engaging literary achievement.”
---Kirkus Reviews, starred review

Crossing Borders: Personal Essays:
“Heart-wrenching.”
---Portland Book Review

He is currently an instructor at the Hudson Valley Writers’ Center in Sleepy Hollow, New York and a resident faculty member of the Yale Writers’ Conference in New Haven, Connecticut. Troncoso has been a judge for the Shrake Award for Best Short Nonfiction from the Texas Institute of Letters. He has also served on the Literature panel of the New York State Council on the Arts, and in 2014 he was co-chair of that panel.

Our Lost Border: Essays on Life amid the Narco-Violence:
Our Lost Border: Essays on Life Amid the Narco-Violence, a treasure trove of one dozen personal essays, deserves to be celebrated, read, and discussed in every community in North America.”
---Literal Magazine: Latin American Voices

To buy books signed and dedicated to you by the author, click the section: Buy Books-Signed by Author.

The Nature of Truth: (2014 revised and updated edition)
Sergio Troncoso's The Nature of Truth single-handedly redefines the Chicano novel and the literary thriller.”
---El Paso Times

The Last Tortilla and Other Stories:
“Enthusiastically recommended.”
---Booklist

Troncoso was inducted into the Hispanic Scholarship Fund’s Alumni Hall of Fame and the Texas Institute of Letters. He also received the Literary Legacy Award from the El Paso Community College. He is a member of PEN, a writers’ organization protecting free expression and celebrating literature. In 2014, the El Paso City Council voted unanimously to rename the Ysleta public library branch in honor of Sergio Troncoso.

The son of Mexican immigrants, Troncoso was born and grew up in the unincorporated neighborhood or colonia of Ysleta on the eastern outskirts of El Paso, Texas. He graduated from Harvard College, and studied international relations and philosophy at Yale University. He won a Fulbright scholarship to Mexico, where he studied economics, politics, and literature.